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How is Dragon Street in Warwick

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How is Dragon Street in Warwick ? Any feedback?

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Anuj Anuj

It is a very quite street with greenery all around. Neat and clean.

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Ranjit Ranjit

Dragon Street is a great street to live. It has close proximity to the super stores and we have friendly neighborhood.


It literally blossoms in Deep pink in Summer season with all the flowers blooming.

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6Hr ago 0 View

How to sell your home amid the COVID-19 restrictions

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QLD: Auctions in Brisbane suburbs were expected to be conducted with live streams and phone bidding as well as strict social distancing and hygiene rules on the ground.

The way Australians buy and sell their homes changed overnight, with group onsite auctions and open homes now banned by the Prime Minister as part of measures to flatten the COVID19 curve. Here’s what’s going to happen now. Fresh off the back of government calls for social distancing to become the norm nationwide, real estate industry peak bodies had braced for bans on group activities within the market, with major agencies also lobbying for the property sector to be allowed to operate under the new restrictions as an “essential service”. Prime Minister Scott Morrison last night named inroom and onsite auctions and open for inspections among the list of activities that would be banned from midnight tonight as part of measures to control the spread of COVID19. First to respond last night was one of the country’s biggest agencies, the Ray White Group which sells one in eight houses in Australia and New Zealand. Ray White Group managing director Dan White said in a statement that “it appears the scope of new business operating practices the group proposed earlier (Tuesday) to support the flattening of the COVID-19 infection curve has been endorsed as appropriate”. ‘No other restrictions were announced for either property management or sales businesses, subject to other restrictions on physical distancing and hygiene,” he said. “The key message to take away is that all real estate onsite and in room auctions and open house inspections will be cancelled as of Wednesday night, but our members will still be able to host virtual property tours, private inspections and online/digital auctions, as we have been encouraging.” He said the industry would take heart from the PM’s statement that ‘all workers in the economy are essential’. “We will carefully adhere to the latest restrictions,” Mr White said, which would provide “some challenges”, but were “necessary to face the current crisis” He said many Australians relied on agents “to support them in renting, buying, selling and managing their homes. We are well prepared to do this”. The PM’s announcement follows an early Tuesday call by the Real Estate Institute of Australia for significant changes to be made to the way all agencies conducted their business. “Past practice with open homes and public auctions needs to cease,” REIA President Adrian Kelly warned earlier in the day. Details:x Sweeping changes for real estate - realestate.com.... The way Australians buy and sell their homes changed overnight, with group onsite auctions and open homes now banned by the Prime Minister as part of measures to flatten the COVID19 curve. Here’s wh... www.realestate.com.au
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1D ago 11 Views

Key changes in taxation law for 2020 that you must know

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