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Joshua

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Is it the best time to buy a property during pandemic?

1Mo ago 0 Replies 50 Views
A quarter of Australians believe the pandemic and its subsequent response has led to the perfect conditions to snap up a property, according to a bank’s research.
About 26 per cent of people surveyed by ING believe it’s the best time to buy a property, as they look to take advantage of five continuous months of falling property prices.

“While, understandably, not everyone is in a position to use their finances to invest, our research has found that for those who are, the preferred investment choice is property, especially in the current climate where interest rates are at a record low.”

Properties shed an average of $12,500 since the beginning of the year, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), but analysts predict a recovery is on the horizon.

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