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Steve

Steve

Suburb review Maryborough

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Hi friends


looking forward to get some review about the suburb Maryborough in Melbourne. Thanks

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Ranjit Ranjit

I have been living in Maryborough for quite a while now. Quite a friendly suburb, huge areas for biking and playing for kids. Close proximity to Kmart.

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Maryborough is a clean and green suburb with affordable houses.


It has close proximity to the shopping malls and other utilities. Good suburb to live.

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